© 2019 Caithness Broch Project.

Existing Sites of Caithness 

The Caithness Broch Project are working to promote and preserve existing archaeological sites within Caithness. We aim to improve signposts and accessiblity to the existing sites, and eventually create an Archaeological Trail encompassing all of Caithness. Read more below and follow the links to the Site pages, and then click on the Interactive Map to explore the locations. 

Brochs

As this is what the project is ultimately attempting to replicate, let's start with the Brochs. So what is a Broch? Essentially Brochs are Iron Age structures, the purpose of which are still open to debate. Were they defensive, habitual settlements or signs of prowess? One thing we know is they are unique to Scotland, (although similar structures have been found across Europe). Caithness has well in excess of 200 Broch sites, and potentially even more in some of the more unexplored areas.

                                 

 

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Cairns

Cairns are also found in abundance throughout Caithness. Cairns are another structure, whose purpose is open to debate. There are many types of Cairn, with many possible uses. Some are thought to represent burial mounds, such as Camster Cairns in the image to the left. Others are thought to be guide markers or have astronomical purposes. Take a trip to visit these sites and perhaps you will understand why our ancestors built these structures.

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Standing Stones

Standing Stones are amongst the most mysterious ancient monuments in many countries. Often large unwieldy blocks of rock, which have been moved and uprighted with a definitive purpose in mind. What this purpose was, is again open to interpretation. In Caithness there are many examples, from monoliths to clusters, get out there and find them.

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Stone Circles

Stone Circles, another enigmatic and mysterious structure found around the Globe. Many famous examples such as Stonehenge exist, but right here in Caithness we have our own. 2 Such examples are the well known Achavanich Stone Circle (pictured right), but a lesser known gem also exists, the Guidebest Stone Circle. The unusual thing about our circles, is the stones face the line of the circle, not the centre, and at Achavanich the circle is actually an oval.

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