© 2019 Caithness Broch Project.

Alastair Sinclair

I was born in Caithness and am currently studying architecture at the University of Edinburgh. In my art, I often draw inspiration from historical forms and precedents.

Brochitecture: Art Deco

Pen on paper

33 x 45 cm

One of my main interests in architecture is learning from vernacular building types to find area-specific design solutions. I have had a particular focus on the broch, and find that their design can still have relevance to contemporary architecture (in Caithness, at least). This project, Brochitecture, is intended as a fun off-shoot of my architectural interest. Where previously I have reimagined Caithness landmarks as brochs, I have now decided to play with different architectural styles.

Frame size

Art size

29 x 42 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Alastair Sinclair

I was born in Caithness and am currently studying architecture at the University of Edinburgh. In my art, I often draw inspiration from historical forms and precedents.

Brochitecture: Classical

Pen on paper

33 x 45 cm

One of my main interests in architecture is learning from vernacular building types to find area-specific design solutions. I have had a particular focus on the broch, and find that their design can still have relevance to contemporary architecture (in Caithness, at least). This project, Brochitecture, is intended as a fun off-shoot of my architectural interest. Where previously I have reimagined Caithness landmarks as brochs, I have now decided to play with different architectural styles.

Frame size

Art size

29 x 42 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Alastair Sinclair

I was born in Caithness and am currently studying architecture at the University of Edinburgh. In my art, I often draw inspiration from historical forms and precedents.

Brochitecture: Gothic

Pen on paper

33 x 45 cm

One of my main interests in architecture is learning from vernacular building types to find area-specific design solutions. I have had a particular focus on the broch, and find that their design can still have relevance to contemporary architecture (in Caithness, at least). This project, Brochitecture, is intended as a fun off-shoot of my architectural interest. Where previously I have reimagined Caithness landmarks as brochs, I have now decided to play with different architectural styles.

Frame size

Art size

29 x 42 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Alastair Sinclair

I was born in Caithness and am currently studying architecture at the University of Edinburgh. In my art, I often draw inspiration from historical forms and precedents.

Brochitecture: Modernist

Pen on paper

33 x 45 cm

One of my main interests in architecture is learning from vernacular building types to find area-specific design solutions. I have had a particular focus on the broch, and find that their design can still have relevance to contemporary architecture (in Caithness, at least). This project, Brochitecture, is intended as a fun off-shoot of my architectural interest. Where previously I have reimagined Caithness landmarks as brochs, I have now decided to play with different architectural styles.

Frame size

Art size

29 x 42 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Alastair Sinclair

I was born in Caithness and am currently studying architecture at the University of Edinburgh. In my art, I often draw inspiration from historical forms and precedents.

Brochitecture: Postmodernist

Pen on paper

33 x 45 cm

One of my main interests in architecture is learning from vernacular building types to find area-specific design solutions. I have had a particular focus on the broch, and find that their design can still have relevance to contemporary architecture (in Caithness, at least). This project, Brochitecture, is intended as a fun off-shoot of my architectural interest. Where previously I have reimagined Caithness landmarks as brochs, I have now decided to play with different architectural styles.

Frame size

Art size

29 x 42 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Alastair Sinclair

I was born in Caithness and am currently studying architecture at the University of Edinburgh. In my art, I often draw inspiration from historical forms and precedents.

Brochitecture: Vernacular

Pen on paper

33 x 45 cm

One of my main interests in architecture is learning from vernacular building types to find area-specific design solutions. I have had a particular focus on the broch, and find that their design can still have relevance to contemporary architecture (in Caithness, at least). This project, Brochitecture, is intended as a fun off-shoot of my architectural interest. Where previously I have reimagined Caithness landmarks as brochs, I have now decided to play with different architectural styles.

Frame size

Art size

29 x 42 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Alice Martin

Alice Martin is a Scottish contemporary artist currently living and working in Stirlingshire. Martin is a Committee Member of GOSSIP (Graduate Opportunities Supporting Sustained Independent Practice), which is based in Stirling. Since graduating from Gray’s School of Art, Aberdeen (2017), she has continued to explore the themes of museology, heritage, archaeology, Classicism and Art history in her art practice. As of September 2018, she is pursuing an MLitt in Archaeological Studies at the University of the Highlands and Islands, in order to inform her work.

Now

Pen on paper with clipboard

23 x 35 cm

The piece consists of three aerial drawings of brochs presented on a clipboard. I decided to create a layered effect by placing the drawings on top of one another. To achieve this result I used a Sharpie, an instrument which can also be found on a typical excavation site. The drawings include Nybster, Ousdale and Whitegate Broch. Each structure can be observed in the Caithness landscape, the title of the artwork also hints at this. The brochs are also roughly relative size to one another, showing how similar they are. To view each drawing individually, the work can be interacted with.

Frame size

Art size

21 x 30 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Andrew Bunn

I make furniture, bowls and sculptural objects out of Scottish hardwoods in the far north of Scotland. My inspiration comes directly from the wood itself and I’m always looking out for unusual pieces of timber. I like to make useful objects that are both unique and beautiful. I use a number of different techniques. I cleave wood along the grain to use the natural shapes within and I carve with chainsaw, arbortech and chisels to achieve different forms. Using hardwood enables me to finish pieces to a high degree allowing the beauty of the wood to be brought out with natural oil and beeswax finishes. My inspiration comes from the wood itself and my designs are fluid. They change as the carving of the piece progresses and the nature of the timber within is revealed. All of my work is carved, not turned on a lathe.

Pictish Harp

Cherry tree woodcarving

Frame size

Art size

70 x 114 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Anja Karlsen

Archäologische Illustrationen

Anja Karlsen studied art history and prehistoric archeology in Berlin. After completing her doctorate, she founded the drawing & design agency "Archäologische Illustrationen". She creates analogue and digital drawings, illustrations and graphics of archaeological objects and sceneries. Her work focuses on the interface between science and mediation. Her scientific drawings are subject to the premise of being authentic - historically accurate and aesthetically pleasing. She currently lives and works in Germany (Berlin, Rostock).

Scottish Brochs Through the Ages

Printed illustration

24 x 32 cm

It is the depiction of a Broch embedded in a Scottish coastal landscape and typical flora of Scotland (thistle, fern). It is an archaeological illustration that refers to the history, geographic location and architectural construction of the historic building - a view and a cross section come to mind. The presentation follows the previously known sources for the architecture of Brochs. Inspired by Cambodian artist VisothKakvei.

Frame size

Art size

20 x 29 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Anon

Untitled

Photo print

23 x 23 cm

Frame size

Art size

20 x 20 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Barbara Cowan

Barbara Cowan was born and resides in Caithness. She specialises in equine portraiture, with commission work created in soft pastel. Her work explores human and equine form, anatomy and movement. She often uses a variety of medium in these studies, working with paint, pastel, ink and metallic leaf.

Carn Liath

Mixed medium with copper leaf

29 x 29 cm

What intrigues me most about brochs are the questions that remain unanswered... The patterns that they have left on the landscape remind me of symbols of an unknown language, open to investigation and interpretation, much like the structures themselves.

Frame size

Art size

15 x 15 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Beth Legg

Born in Caithness but now based in the Trossachs, the remote environment Beth Legg comes from on the far north coast has strongly influenced both the work she produces and the materials she uses. An award winning contemporary jeweller, her work is rooted in a delight in the poetic nature of metal, wood and stone; a fascination with both their surface and content. She has always been fascinated by the hinterlands and quiet edges of places and it is the beautifully bleak and elemental nature of the Scottish landscape that Beth aims to be reflected in her jewellery.

Yarrows Brooch

Brass & Flagstone brooch

This piece is an abstract representation of a broch, focusing on the construction process and stone craftsmanship still visible at Yarrows. The pin is constructed in stone and brass - inspired by a 13th/ 14th century brass brooch which was found at the Yarrows site.

Frame size

Art size

4.5 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Debbie Lee

Debbie Lee grew up in Lochaber and graduated from Glasgow School of Art (Embroidered and Woven Textile Department) in 1992. She worked as a designer for a number of years in both the textiles and outdoor clothing sectors. Following the arrival of her young family she now works as a textile artist producing work which is mainly mixed media/ textile based. She uses a combination of collage, with paper, textiles, found objects, paint, metal and stitch (both hand and machine) to create image with rich colour and texture. The final works depict the scenery of the Highlands of Scotland in which she lives.

Looking North from Nybster Broch

Textiles / collage stitch

53 x 53 cm

The first broch I can remember clearly been spellbound by was the broch near Ben Hope, Dun Dornaigil. I had just completed Ben Hope and could see on my way down the hill the broch further down the glen by the river. At this time you could get more access to the broch and I found it fascinating, other worldly, thankfully it is slighted more protected now from those like me who at the time who wanted to climb amongst the ruins. I have since made a point of visiting many others. Dun Carloway on Lewis and the wonderful Broch of Gurness on Orkney where my young children at an early age played house. Upon moving to Caithness I have been amazed at the spectacularly positioned broch at Nybster, of which my picture is inspired, but wish it had the care of those I had visited earlier to show its prominence and beauty more. It truly has a specular location. Of course Caithness has so many more brochs that offer so much but appear hidden in comparison to those others around the country. Let's hope the Caithness Broch Project bring them to their rightful fore.

Frame size

Art size

34 x 34 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Euan Ferrier

Open Your Eyes to History

Spraypaint on canvas

The artwork came about when I was looking at aerial photography of the Nybster Broch in Caithness. It reminded me on an eiris and the idea have two broch outlines facing each other to represent a pair of eyes seemed like a good idea. The art work is abstract in nature and can be seen as just two brochs or if looked at from a different perspective can look like a pair of eyes looking back to you which inspired the name ‘Open Your Eyes to History’

Frame size

Art size

60 x 20 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Fergus Mather

Painter by degree, photographer by design

Brochxit

Subtly Manipulated Photo

51 x 41 cm

The Birth of Brochxit. My creative work is through photography these days so when Kenny McElroy of the Broch Project asked me to contribute a piece of Artwork for the Brochtober Art exhibition and auction I hunted through my pictures of Broch related stuff and found one of Kenny himself taken at Ness broch near Freswick. We were on a survey with SCAPE, a group concerned with the problem of coastal erosion on archaeological sites, and drew, photographed and recorded sites along the coast from Skirza to Auckengill. Kenny had been out the night before and was a little less dapper and well-groomed than usual. Perhaps that would mean the portrait would not have the desired appeal as fundraiser for auction, but the hair, blond and a bit out of control reminded me of someone, the rest is ‘Brochxit’.

Frame size

Art size

28 x 19 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Gerry Stewart

thistlewren.blogspot.com

Gerry Stewart is a poet, creative writing tutor and editor based in Finland. Her poetry collection Post-Holiday Blues was published by Flambard Press, UK. In 2019 she won the 'Selected or Neglected Collection Competition' with Hedgehog Poetry Press for her collection Totems. Her writing blog can be found at http://thistlewren.blogspot.fi/ and @grimalkingerry on Twitter.

The Broch

Gerry wrote this poem especially for this exhibition. Please note that it is not a physical work that can be bought in the auction.

Frame size

Art size

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Gillian Gibson

gilliangibson.co.uk

I am a Scottish artist currently based on the Isle of Canna. My art practice is multi-disciplinary and I draw inspiration from all aspects of the environment - nature, landscape, archaeology and geology. Overall I aim to capture a sense of place and memory in my work and evoking an environmental connection is important to me as I also work as a Countryside Ranger.

Into the Soil

Watercolour and pencil on canvas

‘Into the Soil’ combines intuitive mark making and pencil detail to create a sense of place, memory and history. It is inspired by Scottish archaeology, in particular brochs and pictish carved stones, as I am fascinated by their survival, shapes and symbols. The landscape they sit within also inspires me, from the surrounding colours of nature to the flora and fauna that has reclaimed brochs, Pictish stones and other archaeological remains as their own. The mystery of past lives and communities interests me and my aim is to capture and hint at a sense of mystery and memory of a past era.

Frame size

Art size

30 x 40 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Ian Charles Scott

Was top of his year in Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art Dundee University, Immediately being taken up by the mercury gallery on Cork Street London Innumerable of his works are in Private collections in Japan, China, Germany, USA, Denmark, France and United Kingdom. His works are on display in permanent collections of: ABERDEEN ART GALLERY McManaus ARTGALLERY AND MUSEUM DUNDEE McManus DUNEEE UNIVERSITY DUNDEE ROYAL SCOTTISH ACADEMY FLEMING COLLECTION LONDON SCOTTISH NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALERY GALLERY STROMNESS MUSEUM KOYO INSTITUTE JAPAN He has received Scotland’s biggest art prize, The Alastair Salvasen award sponsored via the Royal Scottish academy Also Highland artists award from Royal Scottish academy annual exhibition 2003 Greenshields scholarship for realists artists has been won twice - top award

Broch Breath

Ink hand drawn on etching

61 x 74 cm

It depicts the flow country and brochs as the lungs of the earth and the boggy flow country contains all sorts of secrets within its soils

Frame size

Art size

37 x 47 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Ian Pearson

Wine Glass

Glass

Frame size

Art size

23 cm high

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Isabel Macleod

Izzy Macleod spent her childhood and formative years in Caithness, growing up in Castletown, where her parents still live today. As an amateur artist, she has been interested in acrylic pour painting for a few years but has only just come around to trying it out herself!

Seeing Green

Fluid art on canvas

Acrylic pour painting is a world of expression, with colour and light forming its own patterns that so often speak to people in different ways. Someone might see a rough and stormy sea in one piece, whilst someone else might see a beautiful starry night. It is wonderful to experiment with different ways of pouring as well as with different colours. These pieces remind me of a broch here in Caithness which I explored as a child, and another one on the Isle of Lewis. Both of those places hold wonderful memories and as such, it was lovely to be able to put them onto canvas. I was forced to try a new technique to get the brochs themselves to stay in place on the canvas and I'm pleased with how they worked out.

Frame size

Art size

20 x 20 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Isabel Macleod

Izzy Macleod spent her childhood and formative years in Caithness, growing up in Castletown, where her parents still live today. As an amateur artist, she has been interested in acrylic pour painting for a few years but has only just come around to trying it out herself!

The Swirling Sea

Fluid art on canvas

Acrylic pour painting is a world of expression, with colour and light forming its own patterns that so often speak to people in different ways. Someone might see a rough and stormy sea in one piece, whilst someone else might see a beautiful starry night. It is wonderful to experiment with different ways of pouring as well as with different colours. These pieces remind me of a broch here in Caithness which I explored as a child, and another one on the Isle of Lewis. Both of those places hold wonderful memories and as such, it was lovely to be able to put them onto canvas. I was forced to try a new technique to get the brochs themselves to stay in place on the canvas and I'm pleased with how they worked out.

Frame size

Art size

20 x 20 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Jackie Newton

I graduated from Gray’s School of Art in Aberdeen in Illustration/graphics and printmaking, but really since leaving art school all those years ago I have turned much more towards painting, perhaps with a slightly illustrative style, as I tend to use a lot of different media and styles. I have always been drawn to the wild coastlands and the landscape of Scotland especially up here in the far North.

Still Standing

Oil on deep edged canvas

I went for one of the standing stones in Caithness, if only they could talk, the things they have seen, the years they’ve been standing. I tried to go for an impressionist look with the use of pure colour, to convey mood and atmosphere, painting is based on a photo which in its own right was excellent, so didn’t want to just copy that. I have always loved the view of Morven in the background, and I was trying to convey the “ancient feel”. I love the rich history we have here in Caithness, and am so glad that the Broch project is doing such a fantastic job!

Frame size

Art size

46 x 35 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Jane MacRae

I am a Scottish artist, living in the Highlands, painting mainly in acrylics, using palette knife, rags and brush. Particularly inspired by the far north of Scotland, where I grew up, many of my paintings attempt to portray its evocative and unique coastline and rugged landscape. Buildings and the way they sit in their surroundings have always interested me and they often feature in my work. I sell paintings mainly through galleries and art fairs throughout Scotland.

Ousdale Broch

Acrylic on canvas

Frame size

Art size

61 x 51 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Jenny Mackenzie Ross

northshorepottery.co.uk

I studied Fine Art (sculpture) at Newcastle University, graduating in 1985. Since that date I have spent my entire life working with clay. I first gained experience in studio ceramics working with Stuart Whately on the Isle of Skye, where I found a love for wood and soda firing. I remained on Skye for two years before taking a post as production thrower at John O’Groats Pottery. I shared studio in Barcelona for a short while and then returned to Caithness, to a disused oatmeal mill which I have converted into a studio and gallery at Forse near Latheron. In recent years I have been returning to my sculptural roots, but I now approach it with the expertise of 30 years in pottery. The sculpture is a bridge between fine art and craft as the knowledge and understanding of my materials is integral to my working practise.

Under the Flow

Soda glazed stoneware

Two thousand years since the time of the brochs, and ever since the peat has been slowly growing. Around the coast where the bog has not penetrated, the brochs are everywhere to be seen. But what lies inland, under the peat? The flow country is a blanket, and it is a tantalising thought that underneath the acidic peat is the perfectly preserved human landscape of past millennia. We now realise the importance of our blanket bog, for its acidic condition also causes the bog to act as a carbon sink, locking away CO2 from the atmosphere. As the peat goes on increasing in depth, more and more CO2 is locked away and will stay locked away for as long as the peat survives. However, if global temperatures rise too much the bog will start to die. In that situation our past would be revealed to us, but our future would be in doubt.

Frame size

Art size

62 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Joanne B Kaar

I live in Dunnet, on Dunnet Head, Caithness, Scotland, only 2 miles from where I grew up in the village of Brough. I hold a BA Hons Degree from Grays School of Art, Aberdeen, and a Master of Arts from Manchester Metropolitan University. I’ve been self-employed since graduating in Dec 1992 starting as artist in residence for the Isle of Skye a few weeks later. The Guild of Master craftsman published my book ‘Papermaking and Bookbinding Coastal Inspirations in 2003. My artwork takes inspiration from our heritage. As both participant and instigator arts and heritage projects and collaborations I have worked in Taiwan, South Korea, Iceland, USA, Canada, Estonia, Catalonia and have exhibited in Japan, Germany, Australia, Sweden and Finland. My artwork is varied, and is as much at home in museums as art galleries. My current self-directed project takes inspiration from wrap aprons.

Broch I

Mixed

34 x 34 cm

Frame size

Art size

13 x 13 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Joanne B Kaar

I live in Dunnet, on Dunnet Head, Caithness, Scotland, only 2 miles from where I grew up in the village of Brough. I hold a BA Hons Degree from Grays School of Art, Aberdeen, and a Master of Arts from Manchester Metropolitan University. I’ve been self-employed since graduating in Dec 1992 starting as artist in residence for the Isle of Skye a few weeks later. The Guild of Master craftsman published my book ‘Papermaking and Bookbinding Coastal Inspirations in 2003. My artwork takes inspiration from our heritage. As both participant and instigator arts and heritage projects and collaborations I have worked in Taiwan, South Korea, Iceland, USA, Canada, Estonia, Catalonia and have exhibited in Japan, Germany, Australia, Sweden and Finland. My artwork is varied, and is as much at home in museums as art galleries. My current self-directed project takes inspiration from wrap aprons.

Broch II

Mixed

34 x 34 cm

Frame size

Art size

13 x 13 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

John Nicolson

John Nicolson (1843-1934) was a Caithness farmer with a talent for painting and sculpture as well as a deep interest in local history. He was born at Stemster near John O' Groats in 1843, but moved in 1858 to Half Way House at Auckengill, (now Summerbank) where he continued to farm until his death in 1934. Nicolson's interest and knowledge in the history of Caithness was such that he was regularly approached for information on its archaeology, and by people researching family histories. He was approached by RCAHMS Secretary Alexander O Curle in 1909 during the survey of ancient monuments in Caithness, for which he supplied plans that were published in the inventory two years later. John Nicolson played an important role in Sir Francis Tress Barry's archaeological investigations of Caithness. Nicolson acted as Barry's foreman, supervising the excavations and using his artistic talents to illustrate the archaeological sites they investigated and the finds they recovered. Together Barry and Nicolson excavated around twenty five sites in Caithness. Nicolson played an important role in creating visual records of the sites and of the items found. The John Nicolson Collection is therefore significant archaeologically and integral to our understanding of the early history of the region and the work they carried out.

Brims

Print

45 x 56 cm

As well as archaeological drawings, John Nicolson, a self taught artist, sketched and painted many portraits of local people, and also the landscapes of Caithness. His interest in history led him to recreate imaginative scenes from Caithness' history, including sketches of the Norse settlers who occupied the area, and a group portrait of the family of John O' Groat. Nicolson was a prolific artist with a distinctive style, providing Caithness with a unique cultural legacy. Nicolson was also a talented sculptor, executing sculptures of people as well as accepting commissions for monuments, including gravestones, of which numerous examples can be seen in Canisbay Churchyard. Nicolson's most iconic sculpture is perhaps 'Meryvn's Tower' at Nybster Broch, a monument created in commemoration of Sir Francis Tress Barry. Nicolson used the "spoil" from their excavation to provide building material for the monument which is situated on the promontory headland at Auckengill, north of Keiss, just meters along from the Nybster broch itself. The collection was gifted to RCAHMS by Nicolson's grandson in 2005/6.

Frame size

Art size

37 x 27 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Joseph Staitis

My name is Joseph Staitis, a 2nd year architecture student at the Glasgow School of Art. I have a passion for reading the history involving architecture and understanding how buildings have changed and influenced our lives. This often takes the form of understanding the psychology of spaces and what elements alters our perception of space, materials and light.

Thermae

Mixed Media

35 x 47 cm

The project brief was to design a Bathhouse, a space used to relax, socialise and heal. The client in mind were army veterans with physical and mental disabilities, where a strong focus on community was taken, in both the client and in the structure. Our site, Hoggansfield Loch, was on water and the remains of a crannog was discovered, therefore I felt to reference the history of the location by designing a rustic, primordial space was an appropriate decision to make. Expanding my search to Brochs I enjoyed the striking visual impact these “Huts” would make along the shore line. To further reinforce the connection to nature, the baths would be carved into the rock underneath the site, natural insulators that are sustainable in material and energy consumption.

Frame size

Art size

29 x 41 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Julian Smith

I was born in Birmingham in 1957, but 'home' has been Caithness since I was just two years old. A blurry kaleidoscope of childhood memories flowed, seemingly for ever: It was a time when summers were always long and sunny, winters were definitely cold and snowy - but most importantly, there were birds everywhere! As I remember it, cameras hadn't been invented yet, but fortunately oil paint had - which made capturing life, post black-and-white, much easier. Aged nine or ten I had mastered enough control of the medium to render a typical scene (as I imagined it) bang outside our front door - a bizarre world where scale, three dimensions and any concept of ecosystem conventions were clearly some way in the future. This nirvana of untouched landscapes and wildlife (birdlife in particular) was a place I wanted to be – and still do. Birdwatching and drawing kind of went hand in hand from those early years wandering about Caithness - and even today (without any materials) I still study flying birds with a passion and find myself rendering the infinitely beautiful shapes of their wings with my virtual biro. Can't help it. I am drawn to the natural world and I guess I will find ways of channelling my fascination and love for the myriad aspects of its beauty through my creative drive. I am not, and never have been, formulaic in my approach to art, so my output is not always easy to predict. I think I’m comfortable with this - except when I can’t remember how I achieved some of my personal favourite work!

Rangag Reflections

Watercolour

44 x 35 cm

Drawing and painting Loch Rangag with its iconic broch at the north end, gave me some time to contemplate the panorama - and life over the millennia. However we regard ourselves today as a species there is little doubt that we are barely indistinguishable from our forebears. The piles of innumerable stones (and probably bones) that lie hidden just beneath the Caithness surface represent no more than a blink in time. And yet, even as we watch the seasons come and go, we can only wonder at the span of human endeavour and experience that has shaped the landscape and the people we have become. Paintings incorporating annotation have been a feature of much of my work over the years. I find the sketchbook style that includes weather conditions and fieldnotes, especially of birdlife, grounds the piece specifically in time and space – and is somehow so much more meaningful than a simple snapshot.

Frame size

Art size

28 x 19 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Julie Marritt

The Broch

Acrylic on canvas

I didn’t want to paint the broch in its historical, archaeological context. I wanted to paint the broch as if ‘in the present’. The broch represents ‘protection’, a safe homestead for its people. I imagined myself as one of its inhabitants, walking back across the heathland, as the sun sets and the moon rises. Smoke curls out of the roof… a welcoming sight, meaning comfort and hot food, after a day out in the hills. It’s home.

Frame size

Art size

60 x 40 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Kate Robinson

Kate Robinson is an award-winning artist working in sculpture, performance and film. Her public art is sited nationally and internationally. Current commissions include a short film for LUX and the BBC and sculpture for a pilgrimage trail. Her work is about mythology and the earth and she has a strong interest in archaeology as she was artist in residence with the Department of Archaeology at the University of Glasgow.

Moon Broch

Pencil and watercolour illustration

The abstract circular and interweaving form of a stone broch echoes the shape of the moon emerging out of darkness while a pathway leads from the centre into the light.

Frame size

Art size

12 x 15 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Kate Webborn

Kate Webborn is an artist and printmaker, who creates work under the name fourbeatwalk. A Fine Art graduate from Nottingham, she continues to make work from her studio at Backlit in Nottingham, which has gone on to be exhibited internationally. Using traditional and hand printing methods to make the intangible into something physical and tactile, and explore our unreliable memories and our miss-remembered pasts.

Nybster Broch

Three colour screen print

This print of Nybster Broch is inspired by the photos of the excavations from above. They show a dramatic place- perched on the edge of the land, and also, maybe, a Pictish carving of a frog –leaping into the water. An artist working with print is a little like an excavation: you think in layers. First, by drawing three patterns out of the archaeological site, to be built up in three translucent shades of green on top of each other. Then using each drawing to make a stencil from thin paper, cut using very fine scalpel blades - and then squeegee the ink through a silkscreen and the stencil. This gives a flat layer of ink, but the paper quickly becomes saturated, and the stencil can move or break or leak ink. Each print is slightly different when made with a paper stencil – each one is slightly changed by the print before, and changes the print made after. It is an unpredictable way to work – as you cannot make many prints and everything can be lost before you’ve made a single piece of work – but it allows for uncertainty and some magic to happen as you try to capture an idea before it is lost. It is a fitting way to set down Nybster Broch – a site uncovered and preserved against a changing coastline, and where 'Meryvn's Tower' commemorates the site’s excavation, and also moves location as ideas change. I hope these prints have done justice to such a spectacular site – and that your exhibition and sale of work is a huge success! I hope this Nybster Frog brings you luck with the fundraising for the preservation of such a wonderful archaeological landscape.

Frame size

Art size

30 x 42 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Kathy McVittie

Kathy McVittie is a biologist, life-writing companion and poet. Her fascination with the structure, sound and texture of words and plants took her from the fields and gardens of childhood into agricultural research at Cambridge and out again into the landscapes of northern Scotland. Her tools are a pencil and a trowel. She likes to dance and sing, especially under the sky. She shares some of her musings at www.writingpresence.com

Broch Word-Play

Daler-Rowley Ingres pastel paper; office paper; HP laser printer coloured inks; Faber-Castell PITT artist pen 175; Pritt adhesive; double sided tape.

43 x 53 cm

When invited to submit a piece relating to John Nicolson of Half Way House, I realised that the letters of his name would only yield half of the letters that comprise the word BROCH. Adding Francis Tress Barry let me form 'broch' and hundreds more words, Gaelic included. Building a broch for Lyth Gallery Exhibition has become a (continuing) preoccupation. I spot magic words and exclude others, muttering "Can't have that because it has an M..." But for the current piece, the process involved simplifying my original vision of word-slabs (although a few remain). Instead, my broch became a collage of doggerel and word play. Yet 'doggerel' itself is not an allowed word ( no D, no G, and only one E) and neither is 'word-play'. (W, D, P are not allowed). In the end I used only a small proportion of the possible "allowed" words. My choice was influenced by the Caithness Broch Project, by the lives of Nicolson and Barry (who each chose a wife with an "allowed" name!) , and by themes personal to me (such as the Hare, and the North Star).

Frame size

Art size

30 x 40 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Kelly Munro

Kelly grew up on the north east coast of Scotland in a small finishing town called Wick. She is heavily inspired by the towns historic fishing industry. Her collections draw inspiration from creels, nets, ropes, buoys, the Silver Darlings. Her most recent collections are inspired by the drifting tides of Caithness and seaweeds found around the Scottish coastline.

Stones of Wester, Keiss and Kirk Tofts Broch

White metal

Kelly was drawn to the stones found at the broch because of their unique and unusual marks. They translate instantly into a wearable piece of jewellery. This simple necklace is modern yet full of history, the textures have been hammered and rolled into the silver to mimic the patterns of the stones.

Frame size

Art size

2.5 cm high (main piece)

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Kenneth McElroy

A once-promising artiste who took the art world by storm in 1994 with his Christmas tree made from a toilet roll tube and crèpe paper, Kenneth McElroy retreated from the public eye for 25 years. In 2017 he resurfaced as a struggling archaeology student – in a stunt labelled “a really weird bit of performance art”.

Broch Spots

Acrylic on canvas

Damien Hirst x Brochs

Frame size

Art size

40 x 40 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Laura Chiarello

I’m Laura Chiarello, aka @ShyneLC, and I was born and live in the Monferrato hills, in Italy. I got the graduation of the Art School of Casale Monferrato and the Masters in Base Photography and Reportage at the Academy “John Kaverdash School” in Milan. I began painting as a child, but it was after High School that I undertook a path with a personal style mainly by Art Nouveau, Celtic Art and Pop Art. Since 200 I’ve exhibited my works in several solo and group exhibitions in Casale Monferrato, Vercelli, Torino, Cavagnolo, Trino and Villamiroglio. Occasionally I make restorations of chalk votive statues and cribs for churches. As a photographer I’m following a path about black and white graphic images of natural details; I have recently approached the printing of linocats and mail art, and I create embroidery patterns for cross stitch as a freelance.

Faire an Duine

Ecoline, China Ink and Tempere

40 x 30 cm

This artwork depicts a female figure looking into the distance, with long hair blowing in the wind, wearing a tunic and jewels with decorations that recall mofigs of the Celtic and Pictish Art. The background is constructed as a mosaic-landscape and depicts the entrance to the Totaig Broch, known as Caisteal Grugaig. It’s isnpired by the legend of the witch Grugig, who is said to have had her domicile on the hill where the broch stands, called “Watchplace of the Tower” or in the Gaelic “Faire an Duine”. According to the legend, Grugaig bore two giant sons, Telve and Todder, whose names are given to the brochs Dun Telve and Dun Troddan over the hill in Glenelg. I really love Scotland, which I had the pleasure of visiting briefly many years ago, and in particular its splendid landscapes and Celtic culture, in particular everything concerning the Pictish people, and the wonderful and fascinating megalithic structures, on which I have made several searches. For this, I always thought the legends of the witch Grugaig could have a grain of truth, that Caisteal Grugaig could perhaps be the place of origin of the people who built and inhabited the brochs in Glenelg, perhaps because the community had become too big to live in a single broch, so I imagined this woman looking far away, at the immensity of the landscape of the future.

Frame size

Art size

36 x 26 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Lindsey Gallacher

Ist class honours in Design and Applied Arts majoring in Jewellery Edinburgh College of Art Artist in Residence ECA 2001 Owner of The Black Rock Gallery, Newtonmore 2012-2014 VACMA award 2016 Caithness Business fund award 2018 Owner of Lindsey Gallacher studio and Workshop, Thurso 2018 present day Contestant on Sky Portrait Artist of the Year, and channel 4, 2019 You can visit me at my workshop in Swanson street, Thurso, open 11-4pm tue-sat and you may see me working at my bench on other jewellery designs.

Nybster Broch Brooch

Sterling silver and Caithness Flagstone

I only recently found Nybster Broch on my travels and was taken by its location and its defined circular form. When I was approached by Caithness Broch Project to create a piece with a particular broch in mind I knew immediately which one I’d like to use. The brooch shape is influenced by the aerial photo that is featured in their 2019 calendar, brochs and stone circles often appear in one form or other in my regular designs. I feel a real connection with Caithness stone in particular and love the fact the my Great Grandad worked at the pavement works at Thurso East. This brooch has been a real labour of love. Initially I had to find the right piece of stone. I have a number of places in Caithness that I find stone to work with; this particular piece has been taken from near Loch Calder as this is where I was brought up. The oxide layers are particularly noticeable and I carefully etched out the layers to expose the detail before cutting it into a circle, a central circle was cut out, and lastly the doorway was hand cut and sanded. It’s been 5 years since I started working with the material and have learned so much from chatting with both locals and geologists who have a love for flagstone. The sterling silver setting was very tricky to make due to the fragility of the stone; usually when setting stones you have quite a robust material to work with and it can handle quite a bit of firm handling but one wrong move and the stone would have split: thankfully it didn’t. The brooch has not been hallmarked as it was made and finished when working to a deadline but the material is Sterling silver.

Frame size

Art size

3.5 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Lisa Hooper

Lisa was born in Hampshire and has lived in north east Essex, mid Wales, Gloucestershire and Dumfries and Galloway where she has now settled. In 1992 she joined an evening class in etching at what is now the University of Gloucestershire and became fascinated by printmaking. Over successive years her commitment grew and in 1998 she bought her own press and started working from her basement studio in Cheltenham. Lisa began to sell her work at first locally and then further afield. Redundancy from the Civil Service in June 2005 enabled her to relocate to south west Scotland in order to become a full time artist. Her work is varied both in terms of technique and subject matter but her passion for landscape and natural history, particularly birds, is evident in much of her work. She makes linocuts, woodcuts, collagraphs, etchings, monotypes, and Japanese woodblock prints as well as working in some mixed and hybrid print media. The purchase of a Columbian press in 2015 enabled her to produce multiblock and reduction linocuts more accurately and this is reflected in her recent work. Lisa is fascinated by the interaction between machines and the artist, having owned two presses each of which profoundly influenced her work and having recently started to use an ipad for design. Lisa is a member of Galloway Artists and Makers and the Dumfries and Galloway Fine Arts Society and exhibits widely within and beyond the region. Langford Press published her book, First Impressions in 2014. Since then she has won prizes from the National Exhibition of Wildlife Art and from the 2015 David Shepherd Wildlife Artist of the year Exhibition. In 2018 she exhibited solo, for the fourth time, at the Scottish Ornithologists’ Club, in Aberlady. This year she will be exhibiting solo at WWT Caerlaverock and WWT Martin Mere. She has had three residencies at Nature in Art and one at the East Neuk Music Festival and is a regular contributor to the SWLA’s annual open exhibition, The Natural Eye, at the Mall Galleries (winning a prize in 2017). She also exhibits in the Art Marquee at the British Birdwatching Fair at Rutland Water and in a number of commercial galleries throughout the UK. Her second book, Printing Wildlife was published by Langford Press in 2016. She has also contributed to a number of books on printmaking published by Mascot Media and has a portfolio of greetings cards published by Art Angels. Lisa also teaches printmaking and batik on paper from her studio/gallery, which is in her home in Port William, Dumfries and Galloway.

Arrivals: Mousa Broch

Etching

35 x 41 cm

The piece of work I’ve submitted is an etching of Mousa Broch, Shetland. It is entitled ‘Arrivals, Mousa Broch’ and it was inspired by a summer visit at dusk (approximately 11pm) to witness the return of thousands of storm petrels from feeding expeditions at sea. It was quite a misty night. The birds come back to their nests at dusk to avoid predators. There are 300-400 birds nesting in the Broch itself and about 11,000 nesting in the drystone dykes in the islands. The birds are tiny and barely visible in the near darkness as they swoop around the tower and into its crevices. They make a strange and haunting (very unbirdlike) sound as they greet one another. The etched lines around the tower represent the flight paths of some of the birds. The experience of seeing and hearing these amazing little birds was what inspired the print. The ancient tower and their long established rhythmic breeding cycle in this remote location serve to underline a much longer timeline than we can as individuals witness.

Frame size

Art size

16 x 21 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Lisa Poulsen

I take inspiration from a 400 million year old journey cast in stone. Growing up in Caithness, I was surrounded by the county’s flagstone, its heritage, and the vast natural landscape composed during its formation. I see sky, sea and land in the stone’s colours, textures and gradients. Through digital processes, I create landscapes using photographs of Caithness stone captured from various sites including harbours, beaches, paving slabs and even ancient standing stones. Through my work I aim to encourage a deeper connection between people and land. Lisa Poulsen graduated with an Honours Degree of Bachelor of Design Futures from Edinburgh Napier University in 2006. She then travelled for a year before returning to Caithness in 2007. With a new found appreciation for home, Lisa settled in Thurso starting a family and graphic design business called Inspired by Caithness. Working while her children slept, she generated a healthy design client base. After creating the North Coast 500 logo in 2015, Lisa shifted her creative focus from graphic design to follow her true passion as an artist. Lisa’s ‘StoneScape’ collection launched in October 2017 and met high demand. Pre-orders for additional titles and her first commissions were received in 2018. In 2019, Lisa has created original pieces for exhibitions and launched an Orkney StoneScape series exclusively for Sheila Fleet Jewellery.

Thing’s Va View

Original digital art giclee print

67 x 67 cm

Often perched upon clifftops and hills, exposed broch sites in Caithness never fail to fill me with a sense of discovery and awe. I wanted to illustrate the cracking views common amongst brochs and felt that this particularly commanding site fit the bill. Being situated at Blackheath/Hill of Forss, the remains of Things Va broch look out across Thurso Bay, the Pentland Firth and Dunnet Bay meaning the Norse translation of ‘Things Va’ as ‘local court’ packs an impressive parliamentary punch. Notice the abandoned car casually perched upon a cairn - believed to be much older than the broch itself! As a nod to one of Caithness’ original broch hunters and talented artists, John Nicolson, the edge of a stone from Mervyn’s Tower features as the dark moody sky. Mervyn’s Tower was built by John Nicolson after excavating Nybster Broch with Sir Francis Tress Barry in 1900. The land and sea in this StoneScape feature photographs of ancient stones smothered in lichen captured from the internal wall of Nybster broch, which is situated near the village of Keiss in Caithness.

Frame size

Art size

40 x 40 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Meg Telfer

My first real memory of the sea is going in a fishing boat, as a child, to The Bell Rock Lighthouse. My first memory of a historical building, Dunottar Castle in the winter! Since moving to Skerray to live permanently in 1991 the North Coast has been a constant inspiration. I studied at Grays School of Art, Aberdeen, went to Teacher Training College and subsequently taught Art & Design for over 30 years. I work mainly in Acrylic, Painted and Fused Glass and Drawing.

Thing's Va, Broch with a View (1)

Fused and painted glass

These reminders of the past have such a powerful "feel" to them. When I walked up to Thing's Va the hairs were going up on the back of my neck! It was so easy to look out over The Pentland Firth and travel back. There are two plates in the auction: (1) has an interesting visual flaw inside the glass and (2) has an irregular outer edge.

Frame size

Art size

29 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Meg Telfer

My first real memory of the sea is going in a fishing boat, as a child, to The Bell Rock Lighthouse. My first memory of a historical building, Dunottar Castle in the winter! Since moving to Skerray to live permanently in 1991 the North Coast has been a constant inspiration. I studied at Grays School of Art, Aberdeen, went to Teacher Training College and subsequently taught Art & Design for over 30 years. I work mainly in Acrylic, Painted and Fused Glass and Drawing.

Thing's Va, Broch with a View (2)

Fused and painted glass

These reminders of the past have such a powerful "feel" to them. When I walked up to Thing's Va the hairs were going up on the back of my neck! It was so easy to look out over The Pentland Firth and travel back. There are two plates in the auction: (1) has an interesting visual flaw inside the glass and (2) has an irregular outer edge.

Frame size

Art size

29 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Mount Pleasant Primary School, Enhanced Provision Unit

Thurso Mount Pleasant Primary School Enhanced Provision Unit for children with additional needs is taught by Heather Carberry, keen supporter of the Caithness Broch Project. The work was made as a class project.

Untitled

Mixed media

Frame size

Art size

60 x 46 cm (plan)

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Patricia Niemann

Patricia Niemann was trained and qualified in Germany, Scotland and the US as goldsmith and designer for jewellery, gemstones and studio glass. She maintains a studio and showroom in Berriedale. Although my main occupation is the making of one-off fine jewellery, I am particularly interested in the human body and its adornment in a wider sense, considering anatomy and theatre. Most recent work is based on my experiences of the Far North of Scotland: The dramatic beauty of the coastal landscape, the relentless weather, the ancient history - and themes of decay, human burial and archaeology. I am striving to turn ideas based on anthropology and human fears into ‘beautiful’ objects and jewellery in the widest sense.

Reliquary Brooch: Ousdale Broch

Silver, wood (stabilised with resin), steel pin

Ousdale Broch is local to me and has fascinated me since first I saw it. Upon approaching the site, it is not clear what will suddenly appear beneath your feet since most of the building is buried. This piece is about the inside of the broch, which is a relatively high structure. The bottom opening in this brooch signifies the entrance to the internal stairs, above which a partially preserved skeleton was found head down in a cavity during excavations in 1891. At present a rowan tree is growing out of an internal wall, which endangers the structure and will have to be removed if the building is to be preserved. A small twig of this tree is ‘immortalised’ in the piece.

Frame size

Art size

8 cm high

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Penny Irvine

I am a fibre artist living on the North coast of Scotland. I like to create paintings that use traditional techniques but have a more contemporary feel in both their execution and subject matter. I have a keen interest in social and environmental issues and find my art is a great platform to express this.

A Glimpse of the Past

Fibre

83 x 71 cm

I was inspired to create this piece after I learned about the Caithness Broch Project and their ambitious plans to recreate a Broch and use it as an opportunity to educate people about how our ancestors used to live. I am fascinated by the methods used by our ancestors to do the everyday tasks that we take for granted today and would love to see such a project realised. My painting is created using the ancient technique of felting. The background is wet felted using an age-old method used then to make clothing rather than art. The foreground is needle felted and I have also hand embroidered many areas of the picture. It shows various traditional activities that our ancestors would have carried out around a Broch such as farming, weaving cloth, dying skins and grinding corn all set within the stunning backdrop of the highland scenery.

Frame size

Art size

77 x 65 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Sue Rankine

I am a retired teacher who currently resides near Edinburgh with my husband, my daughter and her fiancé. My last teaching post of nine years was teaching children with severe and complex learning difficulties, which I loved and with that I was taught a great deal about the strategies we need to develop for dealing with all the different issues that life can bring us. Prior to moving to the Central Belt I lived in Thurso for over ten years, which I thoroughly enjoyed and when the time came to part I was reluctant to leave the unassumingly historical and culturally rich area. Whilst teaching in the town of Thurso, I wrote a musical for my class to perform. This initiative was used as a resource for enriching their findings in their social studies topic themed. It was based on various historic parts of the locality and the important people who influenced change through the ages. In order to make the venture realistic and appropriate I, along with my pupils carried out detailed research about our community. I have always been interested in history, from researching into huge and far reaching global events to finding out about how the lives of our neighbouring ancestors impacted upon our local society. I am kept well informed of things going on in the Caithness area in general and the Broch project, in particular, through Facebook sites. Since retiring, I was able to devote more of my time to my favourite handicraft hobbies of crocheting, card making and papercrafts and I started to do some long-promised memoir writing (although it has not yet been published - it is well on the way there!) My second new pastime began when I started water colour painting in January this year, whilst on the Cunard cruise ship, The Queen Victoria. This voyage was a long-promised celebration of our joint retirement and we sailed from Southampton to Sydney. I did not stop painting when I left the ship, but I continued and so far it has been a huge learning curve for me. I am still experimenting with all the different techniques associated with it. I have tried acrylic paints, but don’t seem to have the patience for them and have yet to tackle oils. I have found watercolours so comforting in the way that they both govern the paper and how the brush and painting surface respond to each other.

Broch of Ages

Watercolour

36 x 46 cm

My painting uses the medium of water colour. It is called ’Broch of Ages’ – a pun (of which I am fond of making) on the phrase ‘Rock of ages’, with many distinctly contrasting themes, yet melded together. We can define some of these opposites as: • respectful versus disrespectful • functional versus fun • garish versus sombre (vivid and dark) • ancient versus modern • man-made versus naturally formed materials, • enduring versus ephemeral • solid versus hollow • softly lineated versus sharply defined • weather worn versus factory moulded • blending in with the environment versus shouting out at the surroundings. To my mind these are the most obvious diametrically opposed ideas the picture tells us. There is also the modern notion of the ‘quick fix’ for all; if there’s a hole to fill, find the easiest filler, whether suitable or not. It was fun to try to link the idea of Lego bricks to an ancient monument and many other labels came to mind to pin to the work including ‘’Building Brochs’ and ‘ A Quick Fix’.

Frame size

Art size

25 x 35 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Susan Mackenzie

Suzie Mackenzie is an award-winning artist printmaker working from her studio in Golspie, Sutherland. She has a particular interest in the relationships between art and archaeology, having recently successfully completed the UHI Masters-level module ‘Art and Archaeology: contemporary theory and practice’. In May of this year her book on the collagraph technique Making Collagraph Prints was published.

Broch Circles

Monoprint and copper foil

37 x 37 cm

The Image Created especially for the Caithness Broch Project 2019 fundraising exhibition, the images explores the characteristic circular shape of the broch. Each concentric circle within the image is the plan of a broch, whether existing or imagined. As they intersect, overlap, touch or avoid each other, the circles begin to reference many thousands of years of human mark-making spanning the ancient to the contemporary - from cup-and-ring marks and Celtic spirals, to crop circles and steampunk. The technique Broch circles is a monoprint, meaning that it is a unique work. It is a relief print, created by inking the upper surfaces of a collagraph plate; collagraph printmaking at its simplest being the technique of taking prints from a collaged printmaking plate. The print was made using Hawthorn Indigo ink on Heritage Woodfree White paper. The copper foil circles were added after printing.

Frame size

Art size

23 x 23 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Tamara Hicks

facebook.com/seastonestudio

Caithness artist Tamara Hicks studied art at at Gray's School of Art in Aberdeen. She has worked as a designer and CAD operator and is now a designer at Seastone Studio. Her work can be seen in Dunnet forest, Melvich Hotel and Dunnet Bay Distillery. She works in a wide range of media from sculpture to digital branding, signage and murals.

Blue Broch Kirk Tofts

Arcylic and moon gold leaf on canvas

I have grown up exploring the fascinating Caithness landscape and archaeology, and have a particular love for the history and geometry of brochs. This painting is based on a John Nicolson excavation sketch of Kirk Tofts in Keiss from 1895 with aerial shadows for contemporary context.

Frame size

Art size

80 x 80 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Valerie Barker

Valerie Barker is an artist, cartographer and designer. Her work includes botanical illustration, estate maps and embroidery. Currently she is exploring the use of silk and thread to construct landscapes and seascapes observed on and around her croft, in Caithness and in the wider environment. Her research includes study of the literature that illustrates the significance of her subject locations for the people who have recorded them through history and who see them as worthy of note in the present day.

Long ago, not far away: an imagining

Sari silk, thread

94 x 65 cm

I’m intrigued by the presence of history, unremarked and largely taken for granted, in Caithness. My home looks out on two brochs in a landscape only marginally different from the one the broch builders knew. The land I croft has been worked for hundreds of years by people who’ve seen what I see and done what I do. ‘Long ago, not far away’ is an imagining of the Hill O’Works Broch and surrounding Barrock landscape not far from Lyth, long ago. Leave the Arts Centre at Lyth, peel back the onion skins of history, and, not far away, this could be what you see.

Frame size

Art size

69 x 49 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Valerie Ward

A native Shetlander who has travelled and worked internationally as an earth scientist, mainly in Borneo, Australia, Africa and Europe. She completed her Diploma in Art while working as a geology researcher in Brisbane. She is currently studying at the Art Academy of Haarlem in the Netherlands and undertaking a MLitt in Archaeological Studies through the University of the Highlands and Islands. Much of her works are experimental pieces and have sold privately or through small local exhibitions.

The Way of the Trowel

Mixed media (watercolour, watercolour paper, tracing paper with print plus cotton stitching)

33 x 43 cm

Valerie’s work combines textures and forms (both natural and manmade) observed in the landscape. Her works utilise mark making and staining, augmented by stitching. Architectural drawings, original maps, letters and papers are often used as a substrate. She works in both 2D and 3D reflecting her interests in earth sciences and the changing human imprint on the landscape. Her pieces evoke ideas of permanence, change, trace and imprint.

Frame size

Art size

19 x 29 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos

Valerie Ward

A native Shetlander who has travelled and worked internationally as an earth scientist, mainly in Borneo, Australia, Africa and Europe. She completed her Diploma in Art while working as a geology researcher in Brisbane. She is currently studying at the Art Academy of Haarlem in the Netherlands and undertaking a MLitt in Archaeological Studies through the University of the Highlands and Islands. Much of her works are experimental pieces and have sold privately or through small local exhibitions.

Unearthing the Past

Mixed media (watercolour, watercolour paper, tracing paper with print plus cotton stitching)

33 x 43 cm

Valerie’s work combines textures and forms (both natural and manmade) observed in the landscape. Her works utilise mark making and staining, augmented by stitching. Architectural drawings, original maps, letters and papers are often used as a substrate. She works in both 2D and 3D reflecting her interests in earth sciences and the changing human imprint on the landscape. Her pieces evoke ideas of permanence, change, trace and imprint.

Frame size

Art size

19 x 29 cm

sizes approx., not all frames shown in photos